BIG LOTS JOINS LIST OF RETAILERS HIT WITH FCRA CLASS ACTIONS BASED ON BACKGROUND CHECK DISCLOSURE FORMS

On November 2, 2015, Big Lots Stores, Inc. became the most recent big-named retailer to be hit with a class action complaint alleging violations of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).  The lawsuit, filed in the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas, alleges that Big Lots conducted improper background checks on employees in violation of the FCRA.  See Aaron Abel v. Big Lots Stores, Inc., Case No. 151100286.  Specifically, plaintiff claims that the consent form he signed in connection with an application for employment with Big Lots included extraneous information and failed to sufficiently disclose that a consumer report would be procured. The FCRA requires that a clear and conspicuous disclosure be made in writing to an applicant prior to the procurement of a consumer report in a document that consists solely of the disclosure that a consumer report may be obtained for employment purposes.  Notably, the disclosure must be in a separate document (i.e. it cannot be part of the employment application) and the disclosure cannot contain any additional information except for the consumer’s written authorization -- which is also required before procuring a consumer report.

This requirement for a “clear and conspicuous disclosure” has led to numerous recent FCRA class actions, including class actions against Home Depot, Chuck E. Cheese, and Whole Foods.  Markedly, the stakes in FCRA class actions can be quite high, considering the FCRA provides for statutory damages ranging from $100 to $1,000 per violation – even where the consumer suffered no actual harm.  For example, the class actions against Home Depot, Chuck E. Cheese, and Whole Foods each resulted in settlements, ranging from $802,720 to $1.8 million dollars.  This potential for high-value FCRA settlements and judgments leads to the unfortunate possibility of “professional job seekers” who seek out employment applications they know to be defective solely for the purpose of pursuing litigation.  Indeed, The National Law Review recently warned, in an article dated November 11, 2015, that a new breed of “opportunistic faux job applicants” – who have no intention of accepting employment with the targeted employers, are submitting employment applications in an attempt to position themselves as the named plaintiff in class action litigation.  To avoid such exposure, employers should re-examine their background check disclosure forms to ensure strict compliance with the FCRA.

For more information on the FCRA or to request a review of your background check disclosure forms, contact Katherine Olson at 312-334-3444 or kolson@messerstrickler.com.