CFPB to Curb Mandatory Arbitration in Bank Contracts

On October 7th, 2015, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) is set to propose new regulations which would prohibit financial institutions from including arbitration clauses that revoke consumers’ rights to class-action litigation. Such clauses appear in a broad range of financial contracts including, but not limited to, those for credit cards, checking and deposit accounts, prepaid cards, money transfer services, home mortgages, and private student loans. Through this proposal, the CFPB hopes to shift more power to consumers but in doing so, it has sparked national debate as to whether consumers are actually helped or harmed by arbitration agreements. According to a March study conducted by the CFPB, mandatory arbitration clauses affect millions of consumers, of which only 7% were aware such clauses restrict their rights to sue in court. The CFPB hopes their findings will justify the pending regulations; Opponents of the proposed regulation maintain that consumer class actions often times do little to help consumers and impose huge costs to businesses.

For more information regarding the proposed regulations or about the CFPB generally, contact Joseph Messer at 312-334-3440 or jmesser@messerstrickler.com.