EFFECTIVE MAY 13, 2015: UPDATE TO PHILADELPHIA SICK LEAVE REQUIREMENTS

Under the new Philadelphia law, employers with 10 or more employees will be required to provide up to one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked (including overtime hours) by an employee in the city.  Employees who are salaried exempt employees accrue sick time based on the employee's normal work week or a 40-hour work week, whichever is less.  Employees may accrue up to 40 hours of sick leave in a calendar year (unless the employer allows more).  Employers with fewer than 10 employees will be required to provide unpaid sick leave on the same terms.  Employers must update their employee handbooks and provide notification to employees of these new provisions immediately as this was required to be done by May 13, 2015. At its discretion, an employer may loan sick leave to an employee in advance of accrual.  The date on which actual accrual of paid sick leave begins should be measured from May 13, 2015, but the time period for an employee to use accrued paid sick leave is measured by the actual date of employment – an employee must be employed for at least 90 days by the employer before being able to use any accrued paid sick leave.

Like the California law, employers must allow employees to carry over all accrued paid sick leave to the next year, without limit, if the employer does not provide all 40 hours of paid sick leave at the beginning of each year.  Although the carry-over has no limitations, an employer may limit use of sick leave in any single calendar year to 40 hours.

Employers must allow employees to use the 40 hours of paid sick leave on either an oral or written request for their own or for a family member’s need.  Employers are not required to pay an employee for accrued, but unused, paid sick leave at the end of employment but keep in mind an employer will likely be required to pay out any accrued but unused vacation or PTO time pursuant to Pennsylvania state law.

If the employer’s current policy allows for paid sick leave of at least 40 hours, or 5 days, in a year, you do not need to change the policy, but must follow the record keeping and notification requirements and be used for the same purposes and under the same conditions as paid sick leave under the new law.

Employers must provide notice to employees of their entitlement to paid sick leave, including the amount, the terms under which leave can be used, the guarantee against retaliation, and the right to file a complaint regarding violations of the ordinance. Notice can be (a) by written notice in English or in any other languages spoken by five percent of the employees, or (b) by displaying a poster prepared by the city.

Employers must also maintain records documenting the hours worked, sick leave used, and payments made to employees for sick time. The failure to maintain or retain adequate records creates a rebuttable presumption against the employer, absent clear and convincing evidence otherwise. In addition, an employer must make these records available to the city enforcement agency upon request.

Under the new law, employers cannot:

■ Require that an employee find a replacement worker to cover the hours during which the employee is absent as a condition of utilizing paid sick leave.

■ Deny the right to use accrued sick leave or discharge, or take any negative employment action including threats to discharge, demotions, suspensions, or discrimination against any employee for using accrued sick time, attempting to use accrued sick time, filing a complaint with the agency or alleging a violation, cooperating in an investigation or prosecution of an alleged violation, or opposing any policy or practice that is prohibited.

For more information on the new Philadelphia law, employer vacation/sick/PTO policies or any other employment law related matters, please contact Dana Perminas at 312-334-3474 or dperminas@messerstrickler.com for more information.