SEVENTH CIRCUIT REVERSES PRIOR DECISIONS TO THE EXTENT THEY HOLD A DEFENDANT’S OFFER OF FULL COMPENSATION MOOTS THE LITIGATION OR OTHERWISE ENDS ARTICLE III STANDING

In a recent opinion, the Seventh Circuit ruled that a defendant’s offer of full compensation does not render an individual plaintiff’s claims moot.  See Chapman v. First Index, Inc., 2015 U.S. App. LEXIS 13767 (7th Cir. Aug. 6, 2015).  In Chapman, a facsimile recipient brought a lawsuit against the sender alleging two violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).  Defendant subsequently made an offer of judgment (“OOJ”) under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 68 for $3,002.00, an injunction, and costs.  Section 227(b)(3)(B) of the TCPA authorizes awards of actual damages or $500 per fax, whichever is greater, and can be trebled if the violation was willful; while Section 227(b)(3)(A) allows for an injunction.  As Plaintiff failed to identify any actual damages, defendant’s OOJ constituted a fully compensatory offer.  Consequently, when the OOJ lapsed, the district court dismissed Plaintiff’s individual claims as moot. On appeal, the Seventh Circuit reversed and in doing so overruled Damasco, Thorogood, Rand, and similar decisions to the extent they held a defendant’s offer of full compensation moots the litigation.  The Court acknowledged that a case becomes moot only when it is impossible for a court to grant any effectual relief whatsoever to the prevailing party.  By that standard, plaintiff’s case was not moot as the district court could still award damages and enter an injunction.  “If an offer to satisfy all of the plaintiff’s demands really moots a case, then it self-destructs.”  Essentially, even if plaintiff had accepted the OOJ the district court could not have entered judgment, all it could do is dismiss the case, and in that sense as “soon as the offer was made, the case would have gone up in smoke[.]”

Importantly, but without ruling on same, the Seventh Circuit left open the possibility that the district court could have entered a judgment according to the offer’s terms.  Though Chapman holds a rejected OOJ, by itself, cannot render a case moot, Chapman certainly suggests that proper disposition of a case following an unaccepted offer of complete relief is for the district court to enter judgment in the plaintiff’s favor.  Consequently, defendants facing an unaccepted OOJ may choose to move for entry of judgment in accordance with the offer’s terms.  After judgment is entered, the plaintiff’s individual claims will become moot for purposes of Article III.

Notably, whether a class action is rendered moot when named plaintiffs receive an offer of complete relief is currently pending before the Supreme Court.  See Gomez v. Campbell-Ewald Co., 768 F.3d 871 (9th Cir. 2014), cert. granted sub nom. Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez, 135 S. Ct. 2311 (May 18, 2015).  Recognizing same, the Seventh Circuit in Chapman admittedly felt compelled to “clean up the law of the circuit promptly[.]”

For more information on the Chapman decision, Rule 68 offers of judgment or the TCPA generally, contact Katherine Olson at (312) 334-3444 or kolson@messerstrickler.com